In January 2020, I started a new chapter in my life as a person and as an artist by moving from Tokyo to Seattle, and when I was preparing to restart my ceramic activities, there was something that really surprised me.

That is, the fundamentals of ceramics, from clay to glaze materials, are completely different between Japan and the United States. I knew that I couldn't get the clay I used to use, but I had no idea that I would have to learn the glaze recipe from the beginning.

This is the moment when I realized that ceramics is an art form that depends on the environment, where different earths have different ingredients.

For example, in Japan, the basic recipe for glaze is very clear.It is a 7:3 mixture of feldspar and ash. Then, various ingredients are added to this mixture to change the texture and melting point.

However, when I went to a pottery shop in Washington State, they didn't have any "ash" as far as I could see. There was volcanic ash, but I guess it is different from the lime or wood ash sold at pottery shops in Japan. (I bought some volcanic ash, but haven't used it yet. I'll try it later to see what effect it has.)

In the U.S., the feldspar is not so different from the Japan has, but they use a material called "whiting" or frit as an alkali substitute for ash. Geeky as it may sound, whiting is a material that is almost 100% CaO, and frit is a glass powder that makes the feldspar component of the glaze base more soluble. Then add some stone powders such as kaolin, silica, talc, etc. to it to make glaze stable.

As a metaphor, if Japanese glaze materials, which are mined from nature and used almost unrefined, are "Herbal Medicine”, American glaze materials are " Western Medicine," which is made by refining natural materials, separating them into pure materials, and mixing them chemically. 

I was very disturbed by this situation. If I couldn't use the recipes I had been using, I would have to start my studies all over again.

So I desperately tried to learn the "Zegel formula," a difficult formula invented by a German scientist in the 19th century to develop mixing rates for glaze textures. I was not a good student of mathematics, and in the middle of my study, my brain said to me, "You've reached the limit of your understanding! This is the ceiling of your ability!" Poor my blain...

But thanks to the wonderful information network of the Internet and the great civilization of Microsoft Excel, that allowed me to create Zegel equation by simply entering the type and quantity of materials. This is a point I would like to brag a bit about to my professors in my country.

The Zegel formula is not a panacea, but luckily I was able to get a book with American glaze recipes, so now I can mix my glazes again with available materials here. As for coloring materials such as oxidized metals, it is the same as in Japan.

Also, one more another thing that surprised me was the variety of commercially available glazes sold at pottery stores in the U.S.  In Japan, people would say like, "It's hard to make a red color glaze!”.  However, glazes of various colors and textures are available at the U.S pottery store without begging professional to teach you the secret recipe. The variety and quality of U.S. glazes are great that I don't feel the need to mix my own glazes for small quantities.

Japan, with its emphasis on tradition, and the United States, where technology and information are shared widely through the market. I think its difference is thought-provoking.

Also, the firing system is also different between Japan and the U.S. Fortunately, I had been using an American-made electric kiln in Japan, so I didn't have much trouble. And I'm getting used to Fahrenheit.

Someday, when I move to a bigger house, I may build a wood-fired kiln and make my own natural ashes to try making "botanical ceramics". I'm sure it will be fun to research various other styles.

Well, that's it for today. See you next time!

 

【日本とアメリカの陶芸材料の違い】

私は2020年の1月に東京からシアトルへ引っ越して、人間としても作家としても新しいスタートを切ったわけですが、活動再開の準備をしているときに、とても驚いたことがありました。

それは、陶芸のための土から釉薬の材料まで、日本とアメリカでは基礎が全く異なるということ。日本で使っていた土が手に入らないことは分かっていましたが、まさか釉薬のレシピまで1から覚えなければいけないとは思ってもいませんでした。陶芸とは、大地が違えば原料が異なる、環境に依存する芸術であるということを実感した瞬間です。

たとえば、日本では釉薬の基本的なレシピがとてもはっきりしていますね。それは長石と灰を7:3で混ぜるというもの。これに色々な材料を添加して質感を変えたり、融点を変えたりします。

これがワシントン州の陶芸屋さんに行くと、私が見た限りでは「灰」というものを扱っていなかったのです。火山灰(Volcanic Ash)というものはありましたが、日本の陶芸屋さんで売っている石灰や草木灰とは異なるものでしょう。(買ってみましたがまだ使っていません。どんな効果があるのか、後日試してみます。)

アメリカで手に入る長石はさほど日本のものと変わらないのですが、灰に変わるアルカリ成分として、基本的に「Whiting」という材料、またはフリットを用います。ギークな話ですが、WhitingはCaOがほぼ100%の材料で、フリットは要するに、釉薬のベースとなる長石の成分を溶けやすくするガラスの粉ですね。そこにカオリンやらシリカ、タルクなどといった石粉を調合することで、均一で安定した釉薬を作ります。

イメージとしては、自然から採掘された材料をほぼ未精製で使う日本の釉薬原料が「漢方」なら、アメリカの釉薬は、自然の原料を精製して純粋な材料に分け、化学的にバランスよく調合する「西洋薬」といった感じでしょうか。

この状況にはとても困ってしまいました。これまで作ってきたレシピが使えないとなると、1から勉強をやり直さないといけません。

そこで、私は必死になって「ゼーゲル式」という、19世紀のドイツの科学者が発明した、釉薬の質感に関する調合率を編み出す難しい計算式を勉強しました。数学が得意な学生ではなかったので、勉強の途中で自分の脳みそが「もう理解の限界だよ!ここが君の能力の天井だよ!」と咽び泣いているのを意識の彼方で聞いたような気がします。

頑張りました。インターネットという素晴らしい情報網を漁り、Excelという素晴らしい文明を使って関数をまとめられたおかげで、材料の種類と量を入力するだけでゼーゲル式を割り出せる表を作ることができました。これは、故郷の大学にちょっと自慢したいポイントです。

ゼーゲル式も万能ではないのですが、幸いなことに、アメリカの釉薬のレシピが載っている本が手に入ったのでそれを参考にしつつ、こちらで手に入る材料でまた自分の釉薬を調合できるようになりました。酸化金属などの着色剤については日本と同じです。

そういえば、もう一つ驚いたことといえば、アメリカの陶芸屋さんで売っている市販の釉薬の豊富さです。日本だと「釉薬で赤い色を出すのは難しい!」とか、一部の陶芸業界で釉薬調合の難易度が叫ばれていますが、アメリカだとプロに秘密の調合を伝授してもらうまでもなく、色々な色や質感の釉薬が普通に売っています。少量なら自分で調合する必要をあまり感じないくらいには多様で、品質もとても高いように感じました。

伝統を重んじる日本と、技術や情報を市場を通して広くシェアするアメリカ。とても興味深く、なんだか考えさせられます。

あとは焼成温度のシステムも、日本とアメリカでは違いますね。幸い、私は日本でもアメリカ製の電気窯を使っていたのでさほど困りませんでした。華氏にも慣れてきたところです。

いつか広いお家に引っ越したら、薪窯を建てたり、天然灰を自分で作って「ボタニカル陶芸」をやってみるのもいいかもしれません。他に色々なスタイルを研究してみるのも、きっと楽しいことでしょう。それでは、今日はこの辺で。

Saori Matsushita